The PrescQIPP DROP-List

The Drugs to Review for Optimised Prescribing (aka DROP) List has been one of our most popular tools for a number of years with commissioners and clinicians. The document was first released in 2011, built from an accumulation of the top items on local lists of low prioroty treatments and those whre there is a limited evidence base to support use. It has now evolved to incorporate medicines optimisation principles, self care and most recently the NICE do-not-do’s. The list is sorted by spend and items where there is a spend of greater than £500,000 in England and Wales.

The DROP-List: An Introduction

The DROP-List has always sought to support Medicines Optimisation principles, which details that "treatments of limited clinical value are not used and medicines no longer required are stopped. The new DROP-List contains 30 items, which at the time of publication amounted to a total annual national spend of over £336 million. The cost avoidance included within the new document could amount to around £50 million per year.

For each area we will produce an independent bulletin along with implementation materials, however the main DROP-List bulletin contains:

  • Recommendations around the rationale and delivery of the DROP-List items.
  • The top 30 drugs identified as being of the lowest priority for prescribers, and the national annual spend on these items.
  • Summary information on each of the items, along with rationale, where use may be appropriate, suggested alternatives and indicative associated savings.

We have incorporated the NICE do not do’s that can be prescribed and which can be easily measured through epact data, however as part of the work to identify these, we produced a list of all prescribabale do not do.s which has been published as an excel spreadsheet that can be filtered by BNF category. This spreadsheet will be updated quarterly. 

To support the, each month we will publish the DROP-List Scorecard which offers detail on activity and cost avoidance across all of our subscribing CCGs/CSUs.

The DROP-List Items

Below is a list of the now 30 Drugs to Review for Optimised Prescribing items - along with links to where you can find the resources:

The DROP-List Bulletin v4.0 - July 2015

The 2015/16 version of the DROP list  and supporting documents can be found here. A slideset is also available for use locally.

 DROP-List

The DROP-List and Self Care (signpost)

Many of the DROP List projects have a close link to Self Care, which is an important area of our work. We have a webkit dedicated and devoted to this topic which you can visit by clicking the button below:

VISIT THE SELF CARE WEBKIT HERE

The DROP-List in Data

The PrescQIPP Drugs to Review for Optimised Prescribing is one of our most popular project areas. We have traditionally produced a snapshot for this area, however following the release of the NEW DROP-List, we have now updated the monitoring to a whole new level of utility - akin to our other scorecards. 

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 DROP-List Scorecard

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DROP-List Webinar May 2015 - Covering DROP 2015 Update

On the 20th May 2015 we held the a webinar to introduce our 2015 update to the DROP-List - with Sajida Khatri - with a particular focus on the new inclusions such as NICE do-not-dos. You can now view this webinar below:

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DROP-List Webinar April 2014 - Covering 2014 Optimisation of DROP

On the 9th April 2014 we held the all new DROP-List webinar - with Sajida Khatri - in advance of the new DROP List that was published in May 2014. You can now view this webinar below:

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2. Rubefacients (Excluding Topical NSAIDs)

The rubefacients bulletin supports the PrescQIPP DROP list. It reviews the place in therapy of the rubefacients which also have a nice do not do attached to them. An audit and patient letter are available as supporting tools. 

 Rubefacients (DROP-List)

3. Travel Vaccines Not Prescribable on NHS

The travel vaccines bulletin and supporting resources will support CCGs wishing to review their prescribing policies on travel vaccines. It identifies those vaccines that should not be prescribed on the NHS for travel as well as offering advice on developing a local policy on travel vaccines.

 Travel Vaccines

5. Liothyronine

This DROP-List support bulletin looks at the place in therapy of liothyronine and combination products containing levothyroxine and liothyronine. In light of a limited evidence base supporting its use and the increased cost of these products, a review of therapy is recommended. Supporting tools include an audit, patient information letter and community pharmacist notification letter.

 Liothyronine

6. Lidocaine Plasters

This bulletin looks at lidocaine plasters and provides the rationale for not initiating lidocaine plasters in new patients, and for current patients to be considered for discontinuation of their prescription for lidocaine plasters. 

 Lidocaine plasters

8. Doxazosin MR (Cardura® XL)

 Doxazasin

9. Fentanyl Immediate Release Formulations

Immediate release fentanyl has a NICE do not do as a first line treatment for breakthrough pain. This bulletin will focus on fentanyl immediate-release formulations and provide the rationale for new patients to be commenced on immediate-release morphine, and for current patients to be considered for a switch to immediate-release morphine or have their therapy reviewed and stopped where appropriate.

 Fentanyl

11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Other Fish Oils

This bulletin focuses on omega-3 fatty acids and provides the rationale for therapy to be stopped or for patients to be switched to alternative agents and for new patients not to be started on omega-3 fatty acids. 

 Omega-3 fatty acids

13. Dental Products Prescribed on FP10

The Prescribing dental products on FP10 bulletin has been developed to encourage dentists to prescribe and not refer to GPs for a prescription(which can take up valuable appointment time), to ensure private patients have private prescriptions and also that patients are sign posted to self-care and purchase directly where prescriptions are not required. A poster is also available which can be displayed in GP surgeries highlighting key messages for patients.

 Dental products on FP10

14. Co-proxamol (Paracetamol/Dextropropoxyphene) and Tramacet® (Paracetamol/Tramadol)

This bulletin focuses on co-proxamol and provides the rationale for patients to be switched to alternative analgesics and for new patients not to be started on co-proxamol. Information on co-proxamol’s market withdrawal, adverse effects, alternative treatment options in support of the switch and potential switch savings are provided.

 Co-proxamol 

This bulletin focuses on Tramacet® (paracetamol 325mg/tramadol 37.5mg) and provides the rationale for new patients to be initiated on paracetamol or paracetamol with codeine. Current patients should be considered for a switch to paracetamol alone or paracetamol with codeine. Information on the adverse effects of Tramacet®, options for dose conversion in support of the switch and potential switch savings are provided.

   Tramacet

15. Oxycodone/Naloxone (Targinact®)

This bulletin and resources provide further information on the evidence base for for using oxycodone/naloxone prolonged release tablets, the rationale to stop treatment and also suggests alternative treatment options. Support materials are also available for organisations to adapt and use to implement changes. 

 Oxycodone/naloxone prolonged release (Targinact ®) tablets

16. Antifungal Nail Paint

This bulletin focuses on topical antifungal nail treatment, i.e. amorolfine 5% nail lacquer (Loceryl®, Curanail®, Omicur®), tioconazole 28% cutaneous solution (Trosyl®) and salicylic acid, tannic acid and boric acid paint (Phytex®) which are low priority treatments. Self-care may be appropriate for the majority of asymptomatic patients with fungal infection of the nails. If treatment is deemed necessary, a systemic antifungal is more effective than topical therapy.

 Amorolfine 5% nail lacquer

17. Vitamins and Minerals

The vitamins and minerals DROP-List bulletin reviews the place in therapy for the multivitamin and mineral supplements and also the vitamin B complex products. They are not recommended for prescribing as general pick me ups and prescribing should be reviewed and discontinued where appropriate. Audit template and patient letter templates are also available to adapt locally.

 Vitamins and minerals (DROP-List)

18. Dosulepin

These resources review the place in therapy of dosulepin which is listed as a NICE 'do not do'. The drug has a very small margin of safety between the maximum therapeutic dose and potentially fatal doses. An audit is available to support review of current prescribing.

Info_bulletin_SQ.png  Dosulepin (DROP-List)

19. Eflornithine Cream (Vaniqua®) for Hirsutism

This bulletin focuses on eflornithine cream which is a low priority treatment considered as a cosmetic treatment for hirsutism in women. It provides the rationale for self-funded hair removal methods as the primary treatment option for women with hirsutism. It is no.19 on the PrescQIPP DROP-List and is the second PrescQIPP publication to contain a data pack and the new style briefing alongside the bulletin and implementation tools.

 Eflornithine

20. Perindopril Arginine (Coversyl® Arginine) and Branded Coversyl®

This bulletin, focuses on different perindopril formulations (salts) which are not directly equivalent. It provides the rationale for new patients to be commenced on generic perindopril erbumine, also known as tert-butylamine. Current patients can be considered for a switch from Coversyl® Arginine (perindopril arginine) to perindopril erbumine. Options for dose conversion in support of the switch, potential switch savings and information on perindopril adverse effects are also provided.

 Perindopril Arginine

21. Lutein and Antioxidant Vitamins

The lutein and antioxidant vitamins bulletin discusses the lack of evidence available to support lutein and antioxidant vitamins as a treatment for the prevention of age related macular degeneration and provides tools to support review of current prescribing and links to patient information from the Macular Society.

 Lutein and antioxidant vitamins

24. Minocycline for Acne

This bulletin focuses on minocycline for the treatment of acne vulgaris and provides the rationale for new patients to be commenced on an alternative antibiotic and for current patients to be considered for stopping therapy or a switch to an alternative antibiotic. It provides information on the serious adverse effects of minocycline, alternative treatment options and potential savings.

 Minocycline

26. Complementary Therapies, Herbal Supplements and Homeopathy

Coming soon

28. Infantile Colic

The infantile colic DROP list bulletin covers the treatment of colic and the place in therapy for lactase, simeticone and gripe water products. Supporting materials include patient information leaflet and an audit.

 Infantile colic (DROP-List)

29. Probiotics

This bulletin focuses on reviewing prescribing of probiotics (including VSL#3®) and discontinuing therapy, particularly if ACBS prescribing criteria is not met for VSL#3®. An audit and a patient letter are available for organisations considering reviewing this therapy area.

 Probiotics

31. Sunscreens

The sunscreens resource has been added to the DROP list as an item where review of prescribing is recommended to ensure all prescribing is in line with ACBS criteria.

  Sunscreens

Items Removed in the New 2015 DROP-List

Generically prescribed calcium and ergocalciferol (plus colecalciferol and ergocalciferol as individual products) has been removed as this is now included on the SPOT-List (Specials Prescribing Optimisation Tool). Ibandronic acid for osteoporosis, escitalopram, esomeprazole and gliclazide MR have all been removed. This is due to significant price reductions in these category M drugs meaning that they are no longer associated with such significant cost savings.

 Gliclazide

 Esomeprazole